Parents of Grads: What would you do differently?

 

Last night, I watched the two-hour special edition of Glee.  Seeing the students of McKinley High getting ready to graduate, about to head off to follow their education and their dreams made me tear up. I know my time is coming soon to send my oldest off to college and as a parent, I’m not ready.

This year, I began changing as a parent. I have a high school freshman and sophomore and when I saw my teens becoming more independent, I began to give them some room to mature. I watch my friends’ children and my nephew making college plans and securing their dorm assignments and I’m realizing that my time to influence my teens on a daily basis will be short-lived.

I’ve been asking my peers with kids off at college what they would have done differently as parents, what lessons they feel they may have neglected to teach their kids. Do their kids know how to do laundry, address an envelope, make a homemade meal? Do they know how to change a flat tire, french braid hair, write a check or keep tabs on the balance of a checking account?

Suddenly, I feel pressure. I know it’s the big lessons that count the most — how to be a good friend, how to be an ethical student or employee, how to communicate with someone rather than shut them out. But the small things count too.

So for those of you who have sent a high school graduate off to college or into the real world, what would you have done differently before they left? What lessons about work and life should I cram into the next two years before my oldest child graduates?

 

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1 Comment

  1. Karen Meister May 16, 2012 at 8:49 pm

    This is one article that really hit home for me.

    http://t.co/5yVXb1Rh

    And my oldest son, who was distraught over Occupy Wall Street, said and as astounded as I was by a compliment, I already knew: “Mom, you did it right. (utter shock all over my face) You let us fall and get hurt and made us get up on our own, you didn’t fight for us if we got a bad grade in school, you didn’t clean up our messes. You made us do it ourselves and now we can. Thanks.

    Needless to say, going through it was difficult as you watch your baby on the ground crying and not moving on the football field. Other mothers said — why aren’t you running out there to help him? And my response was, as I sat biting my nails on the sidelines in a sweat, I am helping him!

    Karen

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